Courses

BASQ 12000 Elementary Basque I

This course will be an approach to the puzzling language and culture that defines Basque people. A challenge for those who dare to learn a language different from any they have ever heard. A journey to the wonderful land of the Basques, full of enigmas, strong traditions, and peculiar customs that will be discovered through very dynamic activities, such as interactive presentations, brief dialogues, games. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the Basque language through the development of some basic written and conversational skills and through structural analysis. The instructor will propose real communicative situations that will encourage the students to learn the language for the purpose of visiting the Basque Country and being able to communicate in basic ways with Basque speakers. These are usually small classes where it is easy to get a lot of first-hand exposure to the language, and the instructor creates an enriching atmosphere full of entertaining activities and possibilities to hone all skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing—as well as gaining a good grasp of the structure of the language.

2019-2020 Autumn

BASQ 12100 Elementary Basque II

This course will be a continuation of Elementary Basque I, advancing the students’ knowledge of grammatical structure and their receptive, expressive, and conversational skills. The module uses a task-based approach to learning Basque. By means of this methodology, the accumulation of task cycles promotes the acquirement of communicative goals. We will work on different tasks on each lesson, and the progressive build-up of those tasks will cause the gradual improvement of the students’ communicative skills and overall fluency. By the end of the quarter the student should be able to produce grammatically accurate short texts in Basque, interact with speakers of Basque at a basic level while employing a variety of complex cases and tenses, understand a range of basic written and oral texts in Basque, and understand a range of cases and the differences between them. This is achieved by creating a motivating atmosphere where all the students want to take part in the activities, while the teacher guides them during their learning process, providing them with the vocabulary and grammar they need to reach these goals. 

Prerequisites

BASQ 12000 or consent of instructor. 

2019-2020 Winter

BASQ 12200 Elementary Basque III

A continuation of Elementary Basque II, with more emphasis in reading/writing and conversation. To consolidate linguistic competence in Basque and expand knowledge of specific areas of grammar. Emphasis will be placed on oral and written competence. Teamwork and personal input will be essential aspects of this module. We will work on practical objectives and will enact real-life situations in groups. Our final aim will be to achieve a relevant and useful command of the Basque language. As in the previous levels, most activities will be very dynamic and interactive.
 

Prerequisites

BASQ 12100 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Spring

BASQ 24700 Introduction to Basque Culture

Straddling the border of southern France and northern Spain, the land of the Basques has long been home to a people who had no country of their own but have always viewed themselves as a nation. No one has ever been able to find their roots, and their peculiar language is not related to any other in the world, but they have managed to keep their mysterious identity alive, even if many other civilizations tried to blot it out. The aim of this course is to create real situations that will enable the students to learn the meaning of Basque culture. It will be a guided tour throughout Basque history and society. Students will learn about the mysterious origins of the language; they will visit the most beautiful places of the Basque country; they will get to know and appreciate Basque traditions, gastronomy, music . . . and most importantly, they will be able to compare and contrast their own cultures and share their ideas during the lessons, creating an enriching atmosphere full of entertaining activities, such as listening to music, reading legends and tales, watching documentaries, and much more. This course will be conducted in English. It is not necessary to have prior knowledge of Basque language or culture to take this course.

2019-2020 Spring

CATA 12200 Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan.  In this introductory course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Prerequisites

Familiarity with a Romance language.

2019-2020 Autumn

CATA 12200 Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan.  In this indtroductory course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Prerequisites

Familiarity with a Romance language.

2019-2020 Spring

CATA 12300 Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages II

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages. This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in CATA 12200.

Prerequisites

CATA 11100, CATA 12200 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Winter

CATA 21100 Llengua, societat i cultura I

This advanced-level course will focus on speaking and writing skills through the study of a wide variety of contemporary texts and audiovisual materials. It will provide students with a better understanding of contemporary Catalan society. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates.
 

Prerequisites

CATA 11200, CATA 12300 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Autumn

CATA 21200 Llengua, societat i cultura II

This advanced-level course will focus on speaking and writing skills through a wide variety of texts and audiovisual materials. We will study a wide range of Catalan cultural manifestations (e.g, visual arts, music, gastronomy). Students will also review advanced grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates.

Prerequisites

CATA 21100 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Spring

CATA 21400 Languages in the Iberian Peninsula: Multilingualism and Language Ideologies

Crosslistings
SPAN 21401

The course will lead students to explore the situation of the main languages in the Iberian Peninsula from a sociolinguistic perspective (in the wide sense of the word). It will present language diversity in the Iberian Peninsula and lead students to discuss and read about language contact, language planning (including both status and corpus planning), language policy, ideologies and linguistic representations regarding Spanish, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan, Basque, Aragonese and Asturian.

2019-2020 Autumn

CATA 21600 Catalan Culture and Society: Art, music and cinema

Crosslistings
SPAN 21610

This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of contemporary Catalonia. We study a wide range of its cultural manifestations (architecture, paintings, music, arts of the body, literature, cinema, gastronomy). Attention is also paid to some sociolinguistic issues, such as the coexistence of Catalan and Spanish, and the standardization of Catalan. Taught in English.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 10100 Beginning Elementary French I

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French and for those who need an in-depth review of the very basic patterns of the language.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 10100 Beginning Elementary French I

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French and for those who need an in-depth review of the very basic patterns of the language.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 10100 Beginning Elementary French I

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French and for those who need an in-depth review of the very basic patterns of the language.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 10123 Summer Intensive Elementary French

This eight-week course helps students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken French and their use in everyday communication. Attention will be given to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Completing this sequence is the equivalent of FREN 10100-10200-10300 during the regular academic year, and it will fulfill the College language competency requirement for UChicago students.

2019-2020 Summer

FREN 10200 Beginning Elementary French II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in FREN 10100.

Prerequisites

FREN 10100 or placement

Nadine O'Connor Di Vito, Benjamin Ransom, Romain Delaville, Jules Colmart
2019-2020 Winter

FREN 10200 Beginning Elementary French II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in FREN 10100.

Prerequisites

FREN 10100 or placement

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 10200 Beginning Elementary French II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in FREN 10100.

Prerequisites

FREN 10100 or placement

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 10300 Beginning Elementary French III

This course expands on the material presented in FREN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Prerequisites

FREN 10200 or placement.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 10300 Beginning Elementary French III

This course expands on the material presented in FREN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Prerequisites

FREN 10200 or placement.

Cornelia Donisan, Yu Liu, Tanya Mushinsky
2019-2020 Winter

FREN 10300 Beginning Elementary French III

This course expands on the material presented in FREN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Prerequisites

FREN 10200 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 12001 Intensive French I

This intensive, three-quarter sequence brings students with no prior background in French to advanced-low levels in all four skills—reading, writing, speaking, and listening—thus preparing students to take third-year level courses in French. Learners who are starting French late in their College careers or who wish to move forward swiftly will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study by completing the entire sequence. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, students may enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on prior courses or placement exam results. Students may also exit the sequence after any given class and continue in the appropriate course in the Elementary or Intermediate French track. NOTE: Each course is 200 units and corresponds in workload to taking two courses.

Prerequisites

For students with no prior French, or placement in FREN 10100. 

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 12002 Intensive French II

This intensive, three-quarter sequence brings students with no prior background in French to advanced-low levels in all four skills—reading, writing, speaking, and listening—thus preparing students to take third-year level courses in French. Learners who are starting French late in their College careers or who wish to move forward swiftly will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study by completing the entire sequence. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, students may enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on prior courses or placement exam results. Students may also exit the sequence after any given class and continue in the appropriate course in the Elementary or Intermediate French track. NOTE: Each course is 200 units and corresponds in workload to taking two courses.

Prerequisites

FREN 10200, FREN 12001 or placement in FREN 10300. 

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 12003 Intensive French III

This intensive, three-quarter sequence brings students with no prior background in French to advanced-low levels in all four skills—reading, writing, speaking, and listening—thus preparing students to take third-year level courses in French. Learners who are starting French late in their College careers or who wish to move forward swiftly will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study by completing the entire sequence. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, students may enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on prior courses or placement exam results. Students may also exit the sequence after any given class and continue in the appropriate course in the Elementary or Intermediate French track. NOTE: Each course is 200 units and corresponds in workload to taking two courses.

Prerequisites

FREN 20100, FREN 14500, FREN 12002 or placement in FREN 20200. 

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 14100 French for Romance Language Speakers

This course helps students quickly gain skills in spoken and written French by building on their prior working knowledge of another Romance language (Catalan, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of French. This class covers content from FREN 10100 and 10200.

Prerequisites

20100 in another Romance Language or instructor’s consent.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 14500 French for Global Studies and Economics

Designed as an alternative to FREN 20100 for students in Business Economics, Global Studies and related fields of study, this four-skills course meets the grammatical objectives of FREN 20100 while equipping students with the basic communication skills and cultural awareness necessary in the areas of international exchange and economics. Through exposure to a wide range of material—including essays, newspaper and journal articles, film reviews, professional writing practices—and interactive exercises including discussions, in-class activities, and group projects in simulated professional situations, students will acquire the linguistic skills and sociocultural knowledge required for engagement in international exchange and business economics as well as to participate in larger debates in the Francophone context.

Prerequisites

FREN 10300 or placement in FREN 20100. 

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 20100 French Language, History, and Culture I

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of French literature, culture, and contemporary society.

Prerequisites

FREN 10300 or placement.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 20100 French Language, History, and Culture I

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of French literature, culture, and contemporary society.

Prerequisites

FREN 10300 or placement.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 20100 French Language, History, and Culture I

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of French literature, culture, and contemporary society.

Prerequisites

FREN 10300 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 20200 French Language, History, and Culture II

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through a variety of texts, audio-visual materials, and activities.

Prerequisites

FREN 20100 or placement.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 20200 French Language, History, and Culture II

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through a variety of texts, audio-visual materials, and activities.

Prerequisites

FREN 20100 or placement.

Nadine O'Connor Di Vito, Cornelia Donisan
2019-2020 Winter

FREN 20200 French Language, History, and Culture II

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through a variety of texts, audio-visual materials, and activities.

Prerequisites

FREN 20100 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 20300 French Language, History, and Culture III

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding and producing written and spoken arguments in French through readings and debates on various issues relevant to contemporary French society. 

Prerequisites

FREN 20200 or placement.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 20300 French Language, History, and Culture III

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding and producing written and spoken arguments in French through readings and debates on various issues relevant to contemporary French society. 

Prerequisites

FREN 20200 or placement.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 20300 French Language, History, and Culture III

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding and producing written and spoken arguments in French through readings and debates on various issues relevant to contemporary French society. 

Prerequisites

FREN 20200 or placement.

Nadine O'Connor Di Vito, Cornelia Donisan
2019-2020 Spring

FREN 20500 Ecrire en français

The main goal of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the French language and develop their writing skills. This course is strongly recommended for all students who intend to take courses in which writing essays in French is required: French literature classes on campus, the Autumn Paris Civilization program, or the academic yearlong program in Paris. It is also strongly recommended for students who wish to take the advanced proficiency exam in French.

Prerequisites

FREN 20300 or placement.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 20500 Ecrire en français

The main goal of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the French language and develop their writing skills. This course is strongly recommended for all students who intend to take courses in which writing essays in French is required: French literature classes on campus, the Autumn Paris Civilization program, or the academic yearlong program in Paris. It is also strongly recommended for students who wish to take the advanced proficiency exam in French.

Prerequisites

FREN 20300 or placement.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 20500 Ecrire en français

The main goal of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the French language and develop their writing skills. This course is strongly recommended for all students who intend to take courses in which writing essays in French is required: French literature classes on campus, the Autumn Paris Civilization program, or the academic yearlong program in Paris. It is also strongly recommended for students who wish to take the advanced proficiency exam in French.

Prerequisites

FREN 20300 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 20601 Expression orale et phonétique

This course focuses on developing the tools necessary for advanced oral proficiency in an academic context. Through active class participation involving a number of class presentations, students practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). Special emphasis is placed on correct pronunciation. This course does not count toward major or minor requirements.

Prerequisites

FREN 20300 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 20602 Expression orale : Décrire l'art moderne et contemporain en français

This course explores major contemporary French and francophone artists, art forms and art works. Students will acquire basic linguistic and analytical skills to apprehend visual arts, graphic novels, movies and theatrical performance in French. They will work on individual and group art and academic assignments. 
 

Prerequisites

FREN 20300 or placement. Taught in French. A screening and a museum field trip are required.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 21719 Histoire, Superstitions et Croyances dans le roman francophone des XXe et XXIe siècles

Crosslistings
LACS 21719

Africa and the West Indies are generally presented as highly superstitious regions, frozen in beliefs and traditions. Literature appears as the privileged place where these cultural elements are reflected. African and Caribbean writers (more specifically Haiti, Martinique, Guadeloupe and French Guiana) analyze, question, reformulate stories, myths and legends from a tradition that is above all oral. Following them, we will try to go back to the origins of these beliefs and superstitions. We will navigate between theoretical essays and linear narratives to reflect critically, and formulate answers to a number of questions, including: Are beliefs and superstitions only vestiges of an oral heritage? How do they relate to the history of these peoples? What [social] perception do they generate? As part of the story, what effects do they cause to the reader? Do they emphasize specific writing objectives? We will also examine the relationship between these two notions and those of identity and otherness. The most studied authors will be Mariama Bâ, Rene Depestre, Jean-Roger Essomba, Veronique Lordinot, André Paradis, Gisele Pineau, Jacques Roumain, Simone Schwarz-Bart and Veronique Tadjo. what effects do they cause in the reader? Do they emphasize specific writing objectives? We will also examine the relationship between these two notions and those of identity and otherness. The most studied authors will be Mariama Bâ, Rene Depestre, Jean-Roger Essomba, Veronique Lordinot, André Paradis, Gisele Pineau, Jacques Roumain, Simone Schwarz-Bart and Veronique Tadjo. what effects do they cause in the reader? Do they emphasize specific writing objectives? We will also examine the relationship between these two notions and those of identity and otherness. The most studied authors will be Mariama Bâ, Rene Depestre, Jean-Roger Essomba, Veronique Lordinot, André Paradis, Gisele Pineau, Jacques Roumain, Simone Schwarz-Bart and Veronique Tadjo.

Prerequisites

FREN 20500 or 20503. Taught in French.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 21820 Blinding Enlightenment

The French Enlightenment marks a blinding explosion of moral, philosophical, and artistic creativity. The dynamics of self and other are explored as vehicles for critical thought as well as a playful, even ironic understanding of a modern self that is being defined and constructed in and through many of the works that we will read for this course. The dialectics of passion and reason are examined in this unfurling of a newly self-conscious modernity. This introductory-level course will examine some of the great works of the French Enlightenment in their specific relation to the world we have become. Works by Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, and Rousseau, as well as Marivaux and Beaumarchais; genres: theater, novels, philosophical dialogues, and tales. 

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 22120 Clair de Lune: Etude comparée de la lune dans le Romantisme littéraire et musical

Crosslistings
CMLT 22120

The romantic poet has a fascination for the night, the place of mysteries and hidden passions. The moon is the sublime element par excellence, tearing the night, confusing mystery and grandiose. The theme of the moonlight becomes a favorite theme of Romanticism, especially painters, poets and composers. Through a study of the major works of French and German Romanticism (poems, paintings, lieder and sonatas), we will try to examine the different phases of the moon, in order to understand the versatility of the stakes and the topoï of Romanticism. It is an opportunity to revisit consecrated literary genres (the sonnet, the ballad) but also traditional musical or pictorial genres of Romanticism (the overhanging landscape, the nocturnal, the lied). 

The moon leads the romantic poet into a reverie, and sometimes has a consoling role (in a perfect symbiosis with nature), sometimes a melancholy role, the poet seeing the symbol of femininity and being loved. Sometimes, the mystery of the moon that first struck the poet leaves room for the evocation of death or a threat. It finally happens that the poet is embarked on an extraordinary journey: the moon then becomes the fantasy of a supernatural and ideal destination. We will also adopt a comparative perspective in this course, examining the links between text and image, or between music and the political context.
 

Prerequisites

FREN 20500 or 20503. Taught in French.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 23003 Introduction: Voix féminines dans la littérature française

Crosslistings
GNSE 23003

Ce cours nous permettra de réintégrer au canon de la littérature française des ouvrages parfois négligés, tout en prenant connaissance des principaux mouvements littéraires, culturels, et politiques auxquels ces textes appartiennent. 

Prerequisites

FREN 20500 or 20503. This is an introductory-level course. Taught in French.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 23320 Short Stories of the Black Atlantic: A Francophone Perspective

Crosslistings
CRES 23320, CLAS 23320

Since the late-eighteenth century, French writers have relied on the brevity and evocative powers of the short story to inform, shock, and impassion their readers with the realities of slavery, colonialism, and racial violence in the Atlantic World. From Germaine de Staël to Claire de Duras to Prosper Mérimée, the experiences of Africans and people of African descent on both sides of the Atlantic—enslaved or free—have served to shape the contours of a literary genre rooted in a set of romantic sentiments, exotic expectations, and sensationalistic ends. Soon enough, however, the subjects of these lived experiences took the pen to write their own (short) stories, thus cannibalizing the genre in order to fit the necessities of their own cultural settings and political agendas. In this course, we will trace the evolution of the short story as it traveled along the shores, around the themes, and across the traditions of the Francophone Black Atlantic. We will explore the ways in which writers from France, the Caribbean, and West Africa have dialogued with one another to further hybridize a literary genre often defined by its very indefinability. Along with canonical texts by Staël, Duras, and Mérimée, we will read nineteenth- and twentieth-century short stories by Victor Séjour (Louisiana), Frédéric Marcelin (Haiti), Paul Morand (France), Ousmane Sembène (Senegal), and Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe)—among others. 

Prerequisites

FREN 20500 or 20503 for French majors/minors. Class discussions will be in English. All texts will be available in both French and English.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 23406 Contemporary French Cinema

Crosslistings
CMST 23406, GNSE 23406

This course proposes an overview of the contemporary auteur cinema in France. After examining the legacy of the New Wave and their concept of the auteur, we will screen works by a new generation of filmmakers who have been instrumental in creating innovative approaches to cinematic narrative, form, and style. We will study feature films by Leos Carax, Claire Denis, Alain Guiraudie, and Philippe Grandrieux among others. Course readings will include interviews with filmmakers, analyses of their films, as well as contributions providing theoretical frameworks for considerations of authorship, gender, sexuality, post-colonialism, ethnicity, and ethics.

Prerequisites

Admission in Paris Cinema and Media Studies program.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 23444 Voyages littéraires, XXe-XXIe siècles

From real journeys to imaginary journeys, from departure to return, from distant excursions to strolls of proximity, from exoticism to "post-exoticism," the literary journey narrative experiences important variations during the XX and XXI centuries. We will study the various forms that these literary journeys can take, in the face of mass tourism, the contributions of ethnology, and the effects of globalization, among the authors studied: Victor Segalen, Blaise Cendrars, Ella Maillart, Aimé Césaire, Michel Butor, Jean Rolin, Antoine Volodine, and Nathalie Quintane. This is an introductory course.

Prerequisites

FREN 20500 or 20503. Taught in French.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 24801 Foucault and the History of Sexuality

Crosslistings
PHIL 24800, GNSE 23100, HIPS 24300, CMLT 25001, FNDL 22001, KNOW 27002

This course centers on a close reading of the first volume of Michel Foucault’s The History of Sexuality, with some attention to his writings on the history of ancient conceptualizations of sex. How should a history of sexuality take into account scientific theories, social relations of power, and different experiences of the self? We discuss the contrasting descriptions and conceptions of sexual behavior before and after the emergence of a science of sexuality. Other writers influenced by and critical of Foucault are also discussed. 

Prerequisites

One prior philosophy course is strongly recommended.

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 26043 Versailles: Art, Power, Resistance and the Sun King’s Palace

Crosslistings
SIGN 26043

Louis XIV’s Palace of Versailles helped shape European culture and history from the Baroque era through the French Revolution, and it continues to animate contemporary international culture. How does this astounding assemblage of architecture, visual arts, landscaping, performance spaces and political arenas reveal transformations in cultural tastes and power arrangements over the centuries? How do literature and art alternately support and subvert absolutist power and state propaganda? To respond we will range across media, from the bitingly satiric comedies and provocative tragedies of the 17th century (Molière, Racine), through royal edicts regulating colonial slavery and first-hand accounts of the 1789 Women’s March on Versailles that upended the monarchy, and finally to cinematic depictions (from Jean Renoir to Sophia Coppola) and experimental palace installations by the world’s leading contemporary artists (Jeff Koons, Anish Kapoor, etc.). While this course will broadly introduce major themes of French and European culture and history of the early-modern and modern periods, students are also encouraged to pursue in-depth projects in their own areas of interest, from history and political philosophy to the visual arts, theater and performance, and literature.

Prerequisites

FREN 20300 or equivalent. Class conducted in English with French discussion sessions and reading and writing in French for students registered under FREN 26043.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 26811 Agnès Varda

Crosslistings
CMST 28610, FNDL 26506, GNSE 26810

This course examines the work of one of the most significant directors working in France today. From the 1960s to the present day, Varda's films have been crucial to the development of new film practices: both in the past—as with the birth of the French New Wave Cinema—and in the present by exploring new forms of visual narration and by working with moving images in gallery spaces.

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 10100 Beginning Elementary Italian I

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Italian and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Elizabeth Porretto, Clelia Masciello
2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 10200 Beginning Elementary Italian II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in ITAL 10100. 

Prerequisites

ITAL 10100 or placement. 

Fadil Moslemani, Elizabeth Porretto, Darren Kusar, Clelia Masciello, Elana Kranz
2019-2020 Winter

ITAL 10300 Beginning Elementary Italian III

This course expands on the material presented in ITAL 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language. Successful completion of ITAL 10300 meets the language competence requirement. 

Prerequisites

ITAL 10200 or placement. 

ITAL 12200 Italian for Speakers of Romance Languages

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages. 

Prerequisites

20100 in another Romance language or consent of instructor.

Clelia Masciello
2019-2020 Winter

ITAL 12200 Italian for Speakers of Romance Languages

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages. 

Prerequisites

20100 in another Romance language or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Spring

ITAL 20100 Italian Language, History, and Culture I

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Italian-speaking world through the reading of excerpts from contemporary Italian literature. 

Prerequisites

ITAL 10300 or placement. 

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 20200 Italian Language, History, and Culture II

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Italian-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres while reviewing grammatical and lexical items. Cultural awareness is enhanced through close study of contemporary Italian film and literature, as well as through in-class discussion. 

Prerequisites

ITAL 20100 or placement. 

2019-2020 Winter

ITAL 20300 Italian Language, History, and Culture III

This course completes the study of the common grammatical functions and syntactical structures of the oral and written language and introduces students to description and analysis of a variety of texts through written, oral, listening, and reading activities. Students read a contemporary Italian novel and a selection of Italian poetry. 

Prerequisites

ITAL 20200 or placement. 

Fara Taddei, Clelia Masciello
2019-2020 Spring

ITAL 20400 Corso di perfezionamento

This course helps students achieve a very high level of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. Using a variety of literary and nonliterary texts as models, students examine the linguistic structure and organization of several types of written Italian discourse. This course is also intended to help students attain high levels in reading, speaking, and listening through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Italian society. 

Prerequisites

ITAL 20300, placement, or consent.

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 20600 Cinema italiano: lingua e cultura

This course examines aspects of Italian language and culture through the study of a variety of Italian films. While acquiring the necessary vocabulary and conceptual tools to identify formal filmic elements, students will improve their language proficiency and broaden their knowledge of Italian culture, with a particular attention to historical and sociolinguistic features. Film analysis will also help foster intercultural reflection and awareness of selected past and current social issues in Italy. 
 

Prerequisites

ITAL 20300 or consent of instructor. Taught in Italian.

2019-2020 Spring

ITAL 21100 Le regioni italiane: lingua, dialetti, tradizioni

This course expands students' awareness of the diversity of the Italian language and culture. It emphasizes the interrelationship between language and culture, as well as social and historical transformations. We also study the Italian phonological system. Students are exposed to a wide variety of texts, both literary and nonliterary, as well as audio-visual materials that enhance their awareness of regional expressions and Italian dialects. Guest lecturers include native speakers from different Italian regions.

2019-2020 Winter

ITAL 22560 Poetic Postures of the Twentieth Century

Modern poetry begins with a crisis-the loss of the poet's authority. What are the cultural and historical factors that determine this loss of authority? And what are the Italian poets' reactions to such a this crisis? The variety of possible attitudes is wide and ranges between two extremes: the shame for the poetic gesture and the pride of reaffirming its importance. This survey course explores chronologically how these reactions are embodied by poetic postures that go range from the poet as idol (D'Annunzio) to the poet who is ashamed of his own verses (Gozzano), from the playful clown (Palazzeschi) to the sleepwalker (Sbarbaro). Throughout this course, we will see how these attitudes postures can expand into literary movements, but we will also pay attention to how postures can be textualized, manifesting themselves in specific stylistic elements, which we will analyze with careful close readings. 

Prerequisites

Taught in Italian.

2019-2020 Winter

ITAL 23410 Reading and Practice of the Short Story

What are the specific features of the short story? How does this literary form organize different visions of time and space? Informed by these fundamental theoretical questions, this course explores the logic of the short story and investigates its position among literary genres. We will read together a selection of contemporary Italian short stories (privileging the production of Italo Calvino, Beppe Fenoglio, and Elsa Morante, but also including less visible authors, such as Goffredo Parise, Dino Buzzati, and Silvio D’Arzo). The moments of close reading and theoretical reflection will be alternated with creative writing activities, in which students will have the opportunity to enter in a deeper resonance with the encountered texts. This course is especially designed to help students improve their written Italian and literary interpretive skills.

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 25020 Opera Across Media

Crosslistings
MUSI 25020, CMST 24617, SIGN 26058, TAPS 26516

Over the course of the last hundred and twenty years, opera and cinema have been sounded and seen together again and again. Where opera is associated with extravagant performance and production, cinema is popularly associated realism. However problematic these presumptions, the encounter produces some extraordinary third kinds—media hybrids. It also produces some extraordinary love affairs. Hence Thomas Edison wanted a 1910 film of his to be “a grand opera,” and Federico Fellini and Woody Allen wanted their films (And the Ship Sails on and Match Point) to be saturated with opera. This course will explore the mutual attraction of cinema and opera across various operatic cultures in order to interrogate the many issues that their media encounters involve. Among films to be explored are Pabst’s Threepenny Opera (1931), Visconti’s Senso (1954), Powell and Pressburger’s Tales of Hoffmann (1951), Zeffirelli’s La traviata (1981), De Mille’s Carmen (1915), Losey’s Don Giovanni (1979), and Fellini’s E la nave va (1983). No prior background in music performance, theory, or notation is needed. Students may write papers based on their own skills and interests relevant to the course. Required work includes attendance at all screenings and classes, weekly postings on Canvas about readings and viewings, a short “think piece” midway through the course, and a final term paper of 8-10 pages.

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 27020 Modern Italian Cinema: Ways of Representation and Forms of Life (CANCELED)

Crosslistings
CMST 23002

The course aims to focus on the bond that exists in the Italian tradition between ways of cinematographic representation and forms of life. Italian cinema, especially from the post-war period on, has in fact constructed a unique link between cinematographic images and the practices, values, customs and lifestyles of an entire country. At a time of profound historical crisis, the Italian post-Second World War cinema succeeded to revive Italy and Italian cinema, also constituting the development of a properly cinematographic “romanesque form,” which the critic André Bazin thought to have profound analogies with the American modern novel. It is only with cinematographic modernity that cinema reaches the complexity and richness of its forms, through an encounter with a reality that is no longer filtered by the codification of classical generic forms. Authors such as De Sica and Rossellini were in fact able to create a new gaze on the world without the grids of a logically constructed narrative. Films such as Paisà (1946) by Rossellini or Ladri di biciclette (1948) by De Sica not only renewed Italian cinema but the whole cinematographic form. Rossellini’s Viaggio in Italia (1954) is the film that pushes this new form, invented by neorealism, towards the “author cinema” of the Sixties, where the crisis of the subject no longer concerns poverty and misery but a disease of the soul. It is an existential crisis, an “illness of Eros” as Michelangelo Antonioni said (and which will emerge from films like L’avventura, 1960, L’eclisse, 1962, Deserto rosso, 1964), or a crisis that involves characters conceived as “intercessors” of the author, like the protagonists of Fellini’s La dolce vita and Otto e mezzo. The Sixties are a key decade of our cinema. The economic boom of the decade causes a profound existential crisis in society, reflected in the characters and situations depicted in films, such as those of Antonio Pietrangeli (in particular Io la conoscevo bene, 1965) and Marco Ferreri, whose gaze is radicalized in the Seventies. Pier Paolo Pasolini, both as a theoretician – Empirismo eretico gets published in 1972 but the essays are from the mid-Sixties – and as a filmmaker, is also a decisive figure of the period which the course will focus on.

Roberto De Gaetano
2019-2020 Spring

PORT 10100 Beginning Elementary Portuguese I

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Portuguese and for students who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

2019-2020 Autumn

PORT 10200 Beginning Elementary Portuguese II

This course is a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in PORT 10100.

Prerequisites

PORT 10100 or placement.

2019-2020 Winter

PORT 10300 Beginning Elementary Portuguese III

This course expands on the material presented in PORT 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Prerequisites

PORT 10200 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

PORT 12200 Portuguese for Spanish Speakers

Crosslistings
LACS 12200

This class is intended for speakers of Spanish to develop competence quickly in spoken and written Portuguese. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their Spanish language skills to mastering Portuguese by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10300 or consent.

2019-2020 Autumn

PORT 12200 Portuguese for Spanish Speakers

Crosslistings
LACS 12200

This class is intended for speakers of Spanish to develop competence quickly in spoken and written Portuguese. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their Spanish language skills to mastering Portuguese by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10300 or consent.

2019-2020 Spring

PORT 14100 Portuguese for Romance Language Speakers

Crosslistings
LACS 14100

This course helps students quickly gain skills in spoken and written Portuguese by building on their prior working knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, Catalan or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to develop their abilities for further study. This class covers content from PORT 10100 and 10200.

Prerequisites

20100 in another Romance language or instructor’s consent.

2019-2020 Winter

PORT 20100 Intermediate Portuguese

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore selected aspects of Luso-Brazilian tradition through a variety of texts.

2019-2020 Autumn

PORT 20600 Composição e Conversação Avançada

The objective of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the Portuguese language through exposure to cultural and literary content with a focus on Brazil. Students develop skills to continue perfecting their oral and written proficiency and comprehension of authentic literary texts and recordings, while also being exposed to relevant sociocultural and political contemporary topics. Students read, analyze, and discuss authentic texts by established writers from the lusophone world; they watch and discuss videos of interviews with writers and other prominent figures to help them acquire the linguistic skills required in academic discourse. Through exposure to written and spoken authentic materials, students learn the grammatical and lexical tools necessary to understand such materials as well as produce their own written analysis, response, and commentary. In addition, they acquire knowledge on major Brazilian authors and works.

Prerequisites

PORT 20100 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Winter

PORT 21500 Curso de Aperfeiçoamento

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding, summarizing, and producing written and spoken arguments in Portuguese through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Luso-Brazilian societies. Special consideration is given to the major differences between continental and Brazilian Portuguese. In addition to reading, analyzing, and commenting on advanced texts (both literary and nonliterary), students practice and extend their writing skills in a series of compositions.

Prerequisites

PORT 20200, 20600 or consent.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 10100 Beginning Elementary Spanish I

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Spanish, and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 10100 Beginning Elementary Spanish I

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Spanish, and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Daniela Gutiérrez Flores, Katherine Thompson, Darcy Lear
2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 10123 Summer Intensive Elementary Spanish

This eight-week course helps beginning students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken Spanish and their use in everyday communication. It is specifically designed to help you obtain functional competency in speaking, reading, writing and listening in Spanish. The curriculum is the equivalent of SPAN 10100-10200-10300 during the regular academic year, and successful completion of the fulfills the language competency requirement for UChicago students in the College.

2019-2020 Summer

SPAN 10200 Beginning Elementary Spanish II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in SPAN 10100.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10100 or placement. 

Diana Palenzuela Rodrigo, Janet Sedlar, Katherine Thompson, James Weber
2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 10200 Beginning Elementary Spanish II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in SPAN 10100.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10100 or placement. 

Meriam Pacheco Salazar, Pablo Ottonello, Katherine Thompson, Darcy Lear, Rosa Larra, James Weber
2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 10200 Beginning Elementary Spanish II

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in SPAN 10100.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10100 or placement. 

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 10300 Beginning Elementary Spanish III

This course expands on the material presented in SPAN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language as needed to prepare students for the Spanish competency examination.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10200 or placement. 

Paula Motrico, Laura Tain
2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 10300 Beginning Elementary Spanish III

This course expands on the material presented in SPAN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language as needed to prepare students for the Spanish competency examination.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10200 or placement. 

SPAN 10300 Beginning Elementary Spanish III

This course expands on the material presented in SPAN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language as needed to prepare students for the Spanish competency examination.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10200 or placement. 

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 12001 Intensive Spanish I

This intensive, three-quarter sequence brings students with no prior background in Spanish to advanced-low levels in all four skills—reading, writing, speaking, and listening—thus preparing students to take third-year level courses in the language. Learners who are starting Spanish late in their College careers or who wish to move forward swiftly will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study by completing the entire sequence. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, students may enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on prior courses or placement exam results. Students may also exit the sequence after any given class and continue in the appropriate course in the Elementary or Intermediate Spanish track. NOTE: Each course is 200 units and corresponds in workload to taking two courses.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 12002 Intensive Spanish II

This intensive, three-quarter sequence brings students with no prior background in Spanish to advanced-low levels in all four skills—reading, writing, speaking, and listening—thus preparing students to take third-year level courses in the language. Learners who are starting Spanish late in their College careers or who wish to move forward swiftly will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study by completing the entire sequence. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, students may enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on prior courses or placement exam results. Students may also exit the sequence after any given class and continue in the appropriate course in the Elementary or Intermediate Spanish track. NOTE: Each course is 200 units and corresponds in workload to taking two courses.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 12003 Intensive Spanish III

This intensive, three-quarter sequence brings students with no prior background in Spanish to advanced-low levels in all four skills—reading, writing, speaking, and listening—thus preparing students to take third-year level courses in the language. Learners who are starting Spanish late in their College careers or who wish to move forward swiftly will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study by completing the entire sequence. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, students may enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on prior courses or placement exam results. Students may also exit the sequence after any given class and continue in the appropriate course in the Elementary or Intermediate Spanish track. NOTE: Each course is 200 units and corresponds in workload to taking two courses.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 20100 Spanish Language, History, and Culture I

This course is a general extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10300 or placement.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 20100 Spanish Language, History, and Culture I

This course is a general extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10300 or placement.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 20100 Spanish Language, History, and Culture I

This course is a general extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Prerequisites

SPAN 10300 or placement.

SPAN 20102 Spanish Language, History, and Culture for Heritage Speakers I

The goal of this first course in a two-course intermediate sequence is to help students who are heritage learners of Spanish to improve their oral, writing and reading skills and to formalize their linguistic ability. Basic grammatical patterns (e.g. grammar, vocabulary, socio-cultural norms) and orthographic conventions are reviewed and practiced in a variety of short papers, oral presentations and class discussions. Awareness of contemporary Hispanic societies and their historical roots will be enhanced through exposure to a variety of literary and non-literary texts and authentic audio-visual materials. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 10300 or placement. Open only to heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 20200 Spanish Language, History, and Culture II

This course focuses on both objective and subjective description of people, places, and life processes. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media, as well as through in-class discussion.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20100 or placement.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 20200 Spanish Language, History, and Culture II

This course focuses on both objective and subjective description of people, places, and life processes. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media, as well as through in-class discussion.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20100 or placement.

SPAN 20200 Spanish Language, History, and Culture II

This course focuses on both objective and subjective description of people, places, and life processes. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media, as well as through in-class discussion.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20100 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 20300 Spanish Language, History, and Culture III

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore an ample selection of topics, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media as well as through in-class oral presentations and discussions. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20200 or placement. 

SPAN 20300 Spanish Language, History, and Culture III

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore an ample selection of topics, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media as well as through in-class oral presentations and discussions. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20200 or placement. 

Verónica Moraga, Laura Tain
2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 20300 Spanish Language, History, and Culture III

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore an ample selection of topics, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media as well as through in-class oral presentations and discussions. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20200 or placement. 

SPAN 20302 Spanish Language, History, and Culture for Heritage Speakers III

The goal of this second course in a two-course intermediate sequence is to teach heritage learners of Spanish how to use formal written and spoken language to debate and to formulate cogent arguments. Students are expected to analyze particular topics related to the Spanish-speaking world and to participate within an academic forum. Challenging grammatical structures and orthographic conventions are reviewed and practiced in a variety of writing exercises and through class discussions. Students are exposed to a wide range of literary and non-literary texts and audio-visual materials that exemplify the different cultures and regional varieties within the Spanish-speaking world. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20102 or placement. Open only to heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 20302 Spanish Language, History, and Culture for Heritage Speakers III

The goal of this second course in a two-course intermediate sequence is to teach heritage learners of Spanish how to use formal written and spoken language to debate and to formulate cogent arguments. Students are expected to analyze particular topics related to the Spanish-speaking world and to participate within an academic forum. Challenging grammatical structures and orthographic conventions are reviewed and practiced in a variety of writing exercises and through class discussions. Students are exposed to a wide range of literary and non-literary texts and audio-visual materials that exemplify the different cultures and regional varieties within the Spanish-speaking world. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20102 or placement. Open only to heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 20304 Spanish for the Professions

This course is designed as an alternative to SPAN 20300 for students aspiring to use Spanish in a professional context. In order for both courses to serve as equal preparation for the following course in the sequence (SPAN 20400), the textbook used and the grammatical topics covered in SPAN 20300 and 20304 are identical, while some readings, listenings and vocabulary will differ. Students will expand their lexical and cultural knowledge of their chosen professional area through self-selected readings and a presentation, and will hone linguistic skills relevant to any workplace environment.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20200 or consent of instructor.

Darcy Lear
2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 20400 Composición y conversación avanzada I

This course targets the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 20400 Composición y conversación avanzada I

This course targets the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 20400 Composición y conversación avanzada I

This course targets the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 20402 Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos

This advanced language course helps students achieve mastery of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. A wide variety of literary and non-literary texts are read. Through writing a number of essays and participating in class discussions, students are guided in the examination of linguistic structures and organization of several types of written Spanish discourse. This course also enhances awareness of the cultural diversity within the contemporary Spanish-speaking world and its historical roots.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20302 or placement. Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 20500 Composición y conversación avanzada II

This course, the second segment of two in the third-year language sequence, continues the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20400 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 20500 Composición y conversación avanzada II

This course, the second segment of two in the third-year language sequence, continues the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20400 or consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 20602 Discurso académico para hablantes nativos

This seminar/practicum focuses on developing vocabulary and discourse styles for academic verbal communication. This goal is achieved through exposure to taped formal and informal interviews and public debate in the media. Most important, however, is active class participation. Through a number of class presentations, students put into practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews).

Prerequisites

SPAN 20302 or placement. Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 21100 Las regiones del español

Crosslistings
LACS 21100

This sociolinguistic course expands understanding of the historical development of Spanish and awareness of the great sociocultural diversity within the Spanish-speaking world and its impact on the Spanish language. We emphasize the interrelationship between language and culture as well as ethno-historical transformations within the different regions of the Hispanic world. Special consideration is given to identifying lexical variations and regional expressions exemplifying diverse sociocultural aspects of the Spanish language, and to recognizing phonological differences between dialects. We also examine the impact of indigenous cultures on dialectical aspects. The course includes literary and nonliterary texts, audio-visual materials, and visits by native speakers of a variety of Spanish-speaking regions. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or placement.

SPAN 21100 Las regiones del español

Crosslistings
LACS 21100

This sociolinguistic course expands understanding of the historical development of Spanish and awareness of the great sociocultural diversity within the Spanish-speaking world and its impact on the Spanish language. We emphasize the interrelationship between language and culture as well as ethno-historical transformations within the different regions of the Hispanic world. Special consideration is given to identifying lexical variations and regional expressions exemplifying diverse sociocultural aspects of the Spanish language, and to recognizing phonological differences between dialects. We also examine the impact of indigenous cultures on dialectical aspects. The course includes literary and nonliterary texts, audio-visual materials, and visits by native speakers of a variety of Spanish-speaking regions. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or placement.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 21401 Languages in the Iberian Peninsula: Multilingualism and Language Ideologies

Crosslistings
CATA 21400

The course will lead students to explore the situation of the main languages in the Iberian Peninsula from a sociolinguistic perspective (in the wide sense of the word). It will present language diversity in the Iberian Peninsula and lead students to discuss and read about language contact, language planning (including both status and corpus planning), language policy, ideologies and linguistic representations regarding Spanish, Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan, Basque, Aragonese and Asturian.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 21500 Introducción al análisis literario

Through a variety of representative works of Hispanic literature, this course focuses on the discussion and practical application of different approaches to the critical reading of literary texts. We also study basic concepts and problems of literary theory, as well as strategies for research and academic writing in Spanish. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300. Taught in Spanish.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 21610 Catalan Culture and Society: Art, music and cinema

Crosslistings
CATA 21600

This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of contemporary Catalonia. We study a wide range of its cultural manifestations (architecture, paintings, music, arts of the body, literature, cinema, gastronomy). Attention is also paid to some sociolinguistic issues, such as the coexistence of Catalan and Spanish, and the standardization of Catalan. Taught in English.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 21619 From Lorca to Lin-Manuel Miranda: Staging Latinidad

Crosslistings
LACS 21619

In this course, we will delve into ten significant theater plays written in the last century by Spanish, Latin American and Latinx playwrights. We will examine how latinidad, with its multiple definitions and contradictions, emerges in these plays; and also, which questions these works pose regarding the different historic and cultural contexts in which they were written. As a discipline that aims to explore and embody social practices and identities, theater has become a place where these questions articulate themselves in a critical manner. A physical space where bodies and languages explore, sometimes through its mere unfolding on the page and the stage, unforeseen limits of class, identity, and ethnicity.

Each week, we will discuss one play and one or two significant critical essays, and the discussion will be conducted through a set of questions and crossed references. To what extent does the domestic exploration and the all-women cast of Lorca’s La casa de Bernarda Alba resonate in Fornés’ Fefu And Her Friends? How does the experience of immigration affect the characters of Marqués’ La carreta, and how do Chiara Alegría Hudes and Lin-Manuel Miranda echo this foundational fiction in In the Heights? How was the success of plays such as Valdez’s Zoot Suit or Cruz’s Anna in The Tropics received within the Latino community, and how did it affect the general reception of Latino plays? 

Prerequisites

Taught in English. Readings available in both English and Spanish. Spanish majors & minors must do the readings and/or writings in Spanish.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 21703 Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos

This course involves careful reading and discussion of significant works from the Spanish Middle Ages, Renaissance, and the Golden Age, including Juan Manuel's Conde Lucanor, Jorge Manrique's Coplas, the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes, and the theater of Calderón.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 21803 Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos

Este curso ofrecerá un amplio panorama de las literaturas españolas de los siglos XIX-XXI. Buena parte de la historia cultural de España ha estado marcada por la ansiedad respecto al supuesto atraso cultural, político, social y económico del país. La modernidad se convierte así en objeto de deseo y de disputa cultural para los intelectuales españoles que luchan por definir en qué consiste y cómo alcanzarla. Este es el tema que nos guiará, de manera flexible, por las obras de autores como Mariano José de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Leopoldo Alas Clarín, Antonio Machado, Federico García Lorca, Luisa Carnés, Ana María Matute, Max Aub y Manuel Rivas, entre otros, complementadas por algunas películas. En relación con este tema principal, se explorarán también el lugar del campo y la ciudad en la imaginación moderna, la cuestión nacional, las luchas por la emancipación de la mujer, las tensión creativa entre tradición y vanguardia artística, o los debates sobre la historia y la memoria del pasado reciente de España.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

Diego Barros
2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 21803 Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos

Este curso ofrecerá un amplio panorama de las literaturas españolas de los siglos XIX-XXI. Buena parte de la historia cultural de España ha estado marcada por la ansiedad respecto al supuesto atraso cultural, político, social y económico del país. La modernidad se convierte así en objeto de deseo y de disputa cultural para los intelectuales españoles que luchan por definir en qué consiste y cómo alcanzarla. Este es el tema que nos guiará, de manera flexible, por las obras de autores como Mariano José de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Leopoldo Alas Clarín, Antonio Machado, Federico García Lorca, Luisa Carnés, Ana María Matute, Max Aub y Manuel Rivas, entre otros, complementadas por algunas películas. En relación con este tema principal, se explorarán también el lugar del campo y la ciudad en la imaginación moderna, la cuestión nacional, las luchas por la emancipación de la mujer, las tensión creativa entre tradición y vanguardia artística, o los debates sobre la historia y la memoria del pasado reciente de España.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 21903 Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia

Crosslistings
CRES 21903, LACS 21903

This course examines an array of representative texts written in Spanish America from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century, underscoring not only their aesthetic qualities but also the historical conditions that made their production possible. Among authors studied are Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Simón Bolívar, and José Martí. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300. Taught in Spanish.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 22003 Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos del modernismo al presente

Crosslistings
LACS 22003

Students in this course study an array of texts written in Spanish America from the late nineteenth century to the present, including the literature of the Hispanic diasporas. Authors may include José Martí, Rubén Darío, Mariano Azuela, Pablo Neruda, César Vallejo, Teresa de la Parra, Jorge Luis Borges, Octavio Paz, Rosario Castellanos, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Pedro Pietri. 

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300. Taught in Spanish.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 22003 Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos del modernismo al presente

Crosslistings
LACS 22003

Students in this course study an array of texts written in Spanish America from the late nineteenth century to the present, including the literature of the Hispanic diasporas. Authors may include José Martí, Rubén Darío, Mariano Azuela, Pablo Neruda, César Vallejo, Teresa de la Parra, Jorge Luis Borges, Octavio Paz, Rosario Castellanos, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Pedro Pietri.

Prerequisites

SPAN 20300 or consent. Taught in Spanish

Diego Barros
2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 23020 The Poetics of Life in Modern Latin America

Crosslistings
LACS 23020, GNSE 23004

How do Latin American authors imagine humans, animals, and other nonhuman lives? In what ways do considerations of race, gender, and species determine their cultural imaginary? This course will explore representations of life in Latin American fiction from the nineteenth century to the present. Paying special attention to subjects that are considered “other” (women, indigenous people, animals, cyborgs), we will reflect on the ways in which bodies are valued, ordered, and discarded in stories and novels. Through this examination of the hierarchies of life, we will gain insights into the major shifts in Latin American politics of the past two centuries. Moreover, we will see how literature, often considered to simply “mirror” contemporary values, may become a locus of resistance against racist, speciesist, and gender-based oppression and violence. Our readings will be complemented by excerpts from major cultural theorists and critics including Michel Foucault, Donna Haraway, and Gabriel Giorgi. 

Prerequisites

Taught in Spanish. 

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 24020 Para arribar a la ínsula: poéticas de la isla en el Caribe hispano del siglo XX

Crosslistings
LACS 24020

In this course, we will examine the literary representations of the Caribbean's most notable geographic feature: the island. Many Caribbean authors throughout the twentieth century have made the figure of the island a central trope in their essays, novels, and poetry. The focal point of the course will be the many "poetics" of the island, that is, the discourses that seek to envision, mold and construct insular spaces. How does this rhetorical figure help to think about nationality and nationalism, especially in the century of North American colonial intervention? Does the island come to be thought of as a political form, and, if so, how does it relate to other forms like that of the "country"? What are the cultural, political and economic dimensions of these island "poetics"? Who gets to live on these islands, and what temporalities do they inhabit? Primary readings will range across Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, and may include texts by José Lezama Lima, Virgilio Piñera, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Abilio Estévez, Antonio Pedreira, Francisco Matos Paoli, José Luis González, Eduardo Lalo, and Joaquín Balaguer. Theoretical readings on space, insularity and the figure of the archipelago may include Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, Ottmar Ette, and Juan Carlos Quintero Rivera. 

Prerequisites

Taught in Spanish, with some readings in English.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 24701 Introduction to Basque Culture

Crosslistings
BASQ 24700

Straddling the border of southern France and northern Spain, the land of the Basques has long been home to a people who had no country of their own but have always viewed themselves as a nation. No one has ever been able to find their roots, and their peculiar language is not related to any other in the world, but they have managed to keep their mysterious identity alive, even if many other civilizations tried to blot it out. The aim of this course is to create real situations that will enable the students to learn the meaning of Basque culture. It will be a guided tour throughout Basque history and society. Students will learn about the mysterious origins of the language; they will visit the most beautiful places of the Basque country; they will get to know and appreciate Basque traditions, gastronomy, music . . . and most importantly, they will be able to compare and contrast their own cultures and share their ideas during the lessons, creating an enriching atmosphere full of entertaining activities, such as listening to music, reading legends and tales, watching documentaries, and much more. This course will be conducted in English. It is not necessary to have prior knowledge of Basque language or culture to take this course.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 26020 Beyond Guernica. Destruction and Preservation in the Spanish Civil War

Crosslistings
ARTH 21301

This course studies the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) as a testing ground for the Second World War in regards to destruction and conservation, and as a key chapter in the process towards the creation of the notion of World Heritage. Picasso’s "Guernica" epitomizes the image of the Spanish Civil War as a laboratory for destruction, as it encapsulates the vanishing of the idea of refuge in the time of total war. This exceptional devastation was contested through innovative methods to sheltering people and protecting monuments and museums, turning the country into a laboratory for conservation as well. Introducing the significance of this war through the letters of American soldiers who volunteered in Spain, we will reconstruct a series of debates about destruction and conservation from different ideological stands—liberalism, fascism, communism, anarchism—that mobilized the entire population: philosophers, peasants, artists, architects, writers, workers, and the international community. Taught in English. Students seeking Spanish credit will do the readings/writing in Spanish.

Prerequisites

Taught in English. Students seeking Spanish credit will do the readings/writing in Spanish.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 33440 Histories of Reading: Users, Technology, and the Making of Knowledge

As iPhones (and their discontents) regularly remind their human users, average “screen time” is up and changing the way people read. We often perceive this as a rupture with the once eternal-seeming book form, as it gradually creeps into obsolescence. It is easy to forget that the book, far from being timeless, is a specific technology that was designed for a particular mode of reading. This seminar is premised on the argument that the modes of reading engendered by the technology of the book shaped the transmission of knowledge for centuries in the Iberian Peninsula. Histories of reading will consider the way in which different disciplines converge in the study of this process of knowledge-making. In this class we will explore examples of medieval and early modern Iberian manuscripts and early printed books transmitting works by Ramon Llull, Arnau de Vilanova, and Alfonso X, among others, paired with critical pieces by the likes of Ann Blair, Roger Chartier, Fernando Bouza, Sarah Kay, D. F. McKenzie, and Cornelia Vismann. We will also have working sessions at the Special Collections section of the Library of the University of Chicago and the Newberry Library.

Prerequisites

Taught in Spanish.

2019-2020 Winter

BASQ 29220/BASQ 39220 Espacio y memoria en el cine español

Crosslistings
CATA 29220, CATA 39220, SPAN 29220, SPAN 39220

Through the study of a selection of films and documentaries, this course will provide a critical examination of the history and poetics of cinema in Spain, with particular attention to the relation between the representation of space and the recovery of traumatic memory in contemporary culture.

2019-2020 Winter

CATA 23333/CATA 33333 Reading Catalan for Research Purposes

This fast-paced course prepares students to read and do research using texts in Catalan. Students will work on grammar, vocabulary and reading skills, and they will also get introduced to some translation strategies. Part of the texts students will work on will be academic texts in their respective areas of research. 

Prerequisites

Familiarity with a Romance language is highly recommended. 

2019-2020 Autumn

CATA 27020/CATA 37020 Christianity and Islam in the Western Mediterranean World during the Late Middle Ages (CANCELED)

Crosslistings
RLST 27020, SPAN 27020, SPAN 37020

El curso analizará los contactos mantenidos entre mundo cristiano y mundo islámico en el Mediterráneo bajomedieval, tomando la Corona de Aragón y sus ricas fuentes documentales como observatorio privilegiado. Las particularidades de la Corona de Aragón se compararán con las de otros estados cristianos del Occidente mediterráneo que mantuvieron relaciones sostenidas con los musulmanes. Tras la definición de la naturaleza y de las especificidades de los contactos político-diplomáticos, mercantiles y pirático-corsarios entre Cristiandad e Islam, las clases se focalizarán en la identificación y caracterización de colectivos y personas que actuaron como mediadores lingüísticos y culturales entre ambas realidades. Se determinarán las circunstancias y motivos que permitieron que agentes diplomáticos, mercaderes, mercenarios, piratas–corsarios o cautivos–esclavos vehicularan los contactos. Y se analizarán y compararán las distintas tipologías documentales que son plasmación de todos esos intercambios y contactos culturales y humanos. 

Prerequisites

Taught in Spanish.

Roser Salicrú i Lluch
2019-2020 Spring

CATA 29220/CATA 39220 Espacio y memoria en el cine español

Crosslistings
BASQ 29220, BASQ 39330, SPAN 29220, SPAN 39220

Through the study of a selection of films and documentaries, this course will provide a critical examination of the history and poetics of cinema in Spain, with particular attention to the relation between the representation of space and the recovery of traumatic memory in contemporary culture.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 31220 Making Medieval Motets: Materialty, Intertextuality, and Composition Craft

Crosslistings
MUSI 41220

This course explores current understandings of the medieval motet, in the wake of a flurry of recent scholarly interventions in monographs by David Rothenberg (2011), Emma Dillon (2012), Jennifer Saltzstein (2013), Anna Zayaruznaya (2015 and 2018), Catherine A. Bradley (2018), and Karen Desmond (2018). The new genre of the motet emerged in early thirteenth-century Paris in the cultural circles surrounding Notre Dame Cathedral and the burgeoning Parisian University. It represented a radically new form of polyphonic composition that frequently combined sacred and secular elements and traditions to sometimes shocking and ironic effect. Beginning with largely anonymous motet creations in the thirteenth century, which often borrowed and/or re-texted pre-existing materials, the course concludes with the carefully-curated ‘complete works’ collections overseen by Guillaume de Machaut in the mid fourteenth century. Through readings that span a diverse range of scholarly approaches—from sound studies to the study of musical monsters—we will investigate motets ca. 1200-1350 from various angles, engaging with questions of cultural contexts, audiences, and manuscript production; musical chronologies, quotations, and notations; the sonic impact of polytextuality; intertextuality and textual hermeneutics; authorship and authoriality.

Catherine Bradley
2019-2020 Winter

FREN 22620/FREN 32620 Paris from Les Misérables to the Liberation, c. 1830–1950

Crosslistings
HIST 22611, HIST 32611

Starting with the grim and dysfunctional city described in Victor Hugo's Les Misérables, the course will examine the history of Paris over the period in which it became viewed as the city par excellence of urban modernity through to the testing times of Nazi occupation and then liberation (c. 1830–1950). As well as focusing on architecture and the built environment, we will examine the political, social, and especially cultural history of the city. A particular feature of the course will be representations of the city—literary (Victor Hugo, Baudelaire, Zola, etc.) and artistic (impressionism and postimpressionism, cubism, surrealism). We will also examine the city's own view of itself through the prism of successive world fairs (expositions universelles).

Prerequisites

Students taking FREN 22620/32620 must read French texts in French.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 23333/FREN 33333 Reading French for Research Purposes

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research. 

Prerequisites

FREN 10200 or placement in FREN 10300 for undergraduates. No prerequisite for graduate students, though some prior experience with French is highly recommended.

2019-2020 Summer

FREN 23333/FREN 33333 Reading French for Research Purposes

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research. 

Prerequisites

FREN 10200 or placement in FREN 10300 for undergraduates. No prerequisite for graduate students, though some prior experience with French is highly recommended.

Isabelle Faton
2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 23333/FREN 33333 Reading French for Research Purposes

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research. 

Prerequisites

FREN 10200 or placement in FREN 10300 for undergraduates. No prerequisite for graduate students, though some prior experience with French is highly recommended.

Romain Delaville
2019-2020 Winter

FREN 23333/FREN 33333 Reading French for Research Purposes

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research. 

Prerequisites

FREN 10200 or placement in FREN 10300 for undergraduates. No prerequisite for graduate students, though some prior experience with French is highly recommended.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 23335/FREN 33335 Racial France

Crosslistings
ANTH 23335, ANTH 33335

Over the last two decades, questions of race, racial identity, and racial discrimination have come increasingly to the fore in France, despite (or because of) the country's prevailing rhetoric of colorblind indivisibility. These issues are becoming ever more pressing on a background of intensifying racisms and right-wing populisms in Europe. The purpose of this course is to offer analytical perspectives about these critical tensions and their ripples across the landscape of contemporary French politics. Using readings from a wide variety of fields (among others, anthropology, sociology, literature, philosophy, history, political science, and news media), we will unpack the discourses and lived experiences of race that have shaped the politics of national identity and difference in France since the late 18th century. We will see that the question of 'racial France' has been intimately bound up with the country's history of colonialism and decolonization, with its Republican ideology, with matters of law and government, with questions of citizenship, religion and sexuality, with recent debates on multiculturalism, and with white malaise and resentment stirred by the growth of right-wing extremisms. In the course of our examinations, we will also reflect on the specificity of race and racialization in France, and its differences from racecraft in the United States.      

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 23710/FREN 33710 Rousseau’s Confessions: Texte et Contexte

Crosslistings
FNDL 23710

Les Confessions de Rousseau est un texte-clé pour comprendre la constitution du moi moderne. Comme personne avant lui, Rousseau décrit tout ce qui est en jeu dans la définition et l’affirmation de soi. Les Confessions brossent un vaste tableau critique de la société française à l’Âge des Lumières. Dans ce cours nous lirons cette œuvre fondamentale en dialogue avec les textes théoriques de Rousseau afin de mieux comprendre la place à la fois centrale et paradoxale qu’il occupe dans la pensée des Lumières. 

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 34420 Practices of Classicism in the French Seventeenth Century

Crosslistings
CDIN 44420, ARTH 45885, TAPS 44420, CMLT 44410

This seminar has two goals. One is to combine the text-based tradition of French literary studies with the image-based, comparative tradition of art history—and, in so doing, to change the taxonomies of both. The other is to re-evaluate French Classicism by attending to practices of reading, writing, performing, looking and making. The seminar’s breadth is designed to appeal to all graduate students interested in the theory and history of aesthetics, and the interleaving of visual and literary evidence. Looking will be no less important than reading, as we will conduct sessions with original objects in the Art Institute and in Regenstein Special Collections. Authors studied will include Corneille, Molière, La Fontaine, Pascal, and Descartes; among the artists, Poussin, Claude Lorrain, La Tour, and Callot. Critical readings will range from Leo Spitzer to Louis Marin and Foucault. The seminar will be conducted in English; all primary texts will be made available in both English translation and, for those with reading knowledge, in the French original. This seminar will travel to Paris during exam week (March 13-21, 2020); airfare and lodging covered by university. Consent of instructors required.

2019-2020 Winter

FREN 35961 Versailles

Reading and Research course. 

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 26019/FREN 36019 19th-Century French Poetry in Translation: Tradition and Revolution

Crosslistings
SCTH 36012

A study of modern French lyric poetry: Tradition and Revolution, Poetry and Politics, the seedbed of Modernism. For graduate students and advanced undergraduates: Desbordes-Valmore, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Apollinaire. Texts will be read in English with reference to the French originals. Close reading, references to poetry in English, and focus on problems in translation.  

Prerequisites

For advanced undergrads seeking French credit: FREN 20500 or 20503 and at least one literature course taught in French. Students with French should read the poems in the original. Class discussion to be conducted in English; critical essays to be written in English. 

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 26333/FREN 36333 Introduction à la poésie maghrébine d’expression française

Depuis son émergence vers le milieu des années 1930, la poésie maghrébine d’expression française a accompagné les bouleversements politiques dans les trois pays du Maghreb et influencé la production romanesque des écrivains maghrébins. Dans les années 1960, des expériences collectives majeures – telles que la revue Souffles au Maroc – placent la poésie au centre du projet de renouvellement culturel dans la région. A la suite de ces dynamiques de groupes, les poètes maghrébins développent des œuvres poétiques ancrées dans leurs expériences individuelles mais désormais ouvertes sur le monde. Des thématiques récurrentes telles que l’exil, l’errance, le désir de révolte et la quête de la liberté mobilisent des techniques poétiques aussi variées que la violence linguistique, le dialogue avec les mythes ou encore l’utilisation des ressources de l’oralité. En étudiant un corpus d’œuvres poétiques choisies du Maroc (Mohammed Khaïr-Eddine, Abdellatif Laâbi, Saïda Menebhi, Abdelkebir Khatibi), de l’Algérie (Jean Sénac, Mohammed Dib, Tahar Djaout, Assia Djebar) et de la Tunisie (Abdelwahab Meddeb, Albert Memmi, Amina Saïd, Tahar Bekri), ce cours présente une introduction générale à la poésie maghrébine d’expression française. On analysera en particulier les formes, les procédés et les motifs poétiques permettant d’appréhender la figure du poète, sa représentation de la patrie, son discours politique ou encore son univers de représentations sensorielles et symboliques. 

2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 26618/FREN 36618 French-language African Literature in Translation

This course presents an overview of African literature of French expression, focusing on both the text and the context; in particular, on how the African traditions and/or the socio-cultural environment influence the literary creation. It reviews major trends of this literature, from the pre-World War II assimilationist period to the contemporary creations in Africa and France. Additionally, individual creations representative of different periods are reviewed in detail in class or for a final paper produced by the students. The course is abundantly illustrated with videos of authors and performers presenting different works, as well as videos presenting the cultural/social background of the latter. In the end, the students will be able to characterize the different trends of African literature of French expression and illustrate them with specific works. Taught in English. Students seeking French credit will need to complete readings as well as written work in French.

Fidèle Mpiranya
2019-2020 Autumn

FREN 27770/FREN 37770 Existentialism and Its Literary Legacies

More than a school of philosophical thought, existentialism was an intellectual movement that dominated French culture in the years following World War II. This course focuses on the literary legacy of existentialism, considering postwar debates over littérature engagée, the intersections of existentialism and the nouveau roman, and the importance of feminist existentialism for women writers. Why did existentialist thinkers turn to forms of literary expression, writing plays and novels? How did they shape the reception of other writers, and how did later writers revisit existentialist concerns? Readings may include texts by Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Gabriel Marcel, Simone de Beauvoir, Nathalie Sarraute, Monique Wittig, Georges Perec, and Annie Ernaux. 
 

Prerequisites

Readings and discussion section in French.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 29800/FREN 39800 Realism in the Novel

Crosslistings
CMLT 29811, CMLT 39801

The novel and its shorter version, the novella, invite us to think about several crucial moral and social links between human beings based on loyalty, love, courage, friendship, but also involving injustice, exclusion, moral blindness, and repression. After discussing earlier approaches, the course will examine how the nineteenth-century novel presents human actions and passions in the light of the actual organization of society, the struggle for equality, the growing importance of individual self-reliance and the interest in other cultures. Course taught in English, one hour per week discussion in French.

Students will be required to read between 120 and 160 pages per week. The readings include: Cervantes, The Ill-advised Curiosity, Marie de Lafayette, from The Princess of Clèves, Richardson, from Pamela, Kleist, Michael Kohlhaas, Balzac Le Colonel Chabert, George Eliot, Silas Marner, Melville, Benito Cereno, Flaubert, A Simple Heart, Fontane, from Effi Briest, Galdós, from Nazarín, Machado de Assis, Dom Casmurro.

2019-2020 Spring

FREN 41201 Literature of the Shoah, Philosophy in the Shoah

Crosslistings
ITAL 41201, ITAL 51210

This seminar will focus on three authors––Charlotte Delbo, Primo Levi, and Zalman Gradowski––each of whom wrote a literary masterpiece about their experiences in Auschwitz. All of their works also raise profound philosophical questions. Delbo, a member of the French Resistance, was deported to Auschwitz and wrote a truly remarkable trilogy, Auschwitz and After, that makes use of a variety of literary genres. Levi, deported as a Jew, wrote two classic prose works, If This is a Man and The Drowned and the Saved. Gradowski, the least well known of these authors, was assigned to the Sonderkommando in Auschwitz. Before being murdered, he wrote two extraordinary manuscripts and buried them under the ashes of Birkenau, where they were discovered after the war. Delbo and Levi both exist in English translation. However, there is not yet a complete translation of Gradowski into English. (His manuscripts were written in Yiddish). We will read the superb French translation of his manuscripts, which is accompanied by an important critical apparatus. Reading knowledge of French is therefore a prerequisite for this course.

A central concern of this seminar will be the relation between literary expression and philosophical insight. We will also take up the question of how the Shoah can be represented and what philosophy can say about it. Finally, we will consider writing as a form of ethical and political resistance. We will read these works from several perspectives––philosophical and theological, literary, and historical. 

Prerequisites

Taught in English. Reading knowledge of French is required.

2019-2020 Winter

ITAL 22000/ITAL 32000 Dante's Divine Comedy 2: Purgatorio

Crosslistings
FNDL 27202

This course is an intense study of the middle cantica of the Divine Comedy and its relationship with Dante’s early masterpiece, the Vita Nuova. The very middleness of the Purgatorio provides Dante the opportunity to explore a variety of problems dealing with our life here, now, on earth: contemporary politics, the relationship between body and soul, poetry and the literary canon, art and imagination, the nature of dreams, and, of course, love and desire. The Purgatorio is also Dante’s most original contribution to the imagination of the underworld, equally influenced by new conceptualizations of “merchant time” and by contemporary travel writing and fantastic voyages.

2019-2020 Spring

ITAL 23000/ITAL 33001 Machiavelli and Machiavellism

Crosslistings
FNDL 21603,CMLT 25801,CMLT 35801

This course is a comprehensive introduction to Machiavelli’s The Prince in light of his vast and varied literary corpus and European reception. The course includes discussion of Machiavelli as playwright (The Mandrake), fiction writer (Belfagor, The Golden Ass), and historian (Discourses, Florentine Histories). We will also closely investigate the emergence of myths surrounding Machiavelli (Machiavellism and anti-Machiavellism) in Italy (Guicciardini, Botero, Boccalini), France (Bodin and Gentillet), Spain (Ribadeneyra), and Northern Europe (Hobbes, Grotius, Spinoza) during the Counter Reformation and beyond. 

Prerequisites

Course conducted in English. Those seeking Italian credit will do all work in Italian.

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 23020/ITAL 33020 The Italian Cinematographic Comedy (CANCELED)

Crosslistings
CMST 23030, CMST 33030

An important genre in Italian cinema is represented by the “commedia,” in particular the declination “all’italiana.” It is a very original form of representation of the world invented by Italian cinema. The comedy genre has marked many decades of Italian cinematography: from the plot comedies of the Fifties (going back until the Thirties) with films like Due soldi di speranza (1952) by Renato Castellani, to the grotesque comedy of masks of the Sixties, with authors such as Dino Risi (Il sorpasso, 1962, I mostri, 1963), Mario Monicelli (La Grande Guerra, 1959) and Pietro Germi (Divorzio all’italiana, 1961, Sedotta e abbandonata, 1964), up to the dominance of the grotesque representation of the world, with authors such as Elio Petri (Indagine su un cittadino al di sopra di ogni sospetto, 1972). The heritage of the commedia all’italiana can be found in contemporary Italian cinema, as for example with Nanni Moretti. Moretti’s cinema in fact summarizes the entire inheritance of Italian cinematographic modernity – starting from neorealism and up to comedy and author cinema – in one of the most effective ways. The Italian cinematographic comedy is also rooted in the Italian literary tradition, in the masks of “commedia dell’arte”, and generally speaking in the different aspects of grotesque tradition (as analyzed by Bakhtin).

Prerequisites

Open to advanced undergrads with consent of instructor.

Roberto De Gaetano
2019-2020 Spring

ITAL 23502/ITAL 33502 Boccaccio's Decameron

Crosslistings
FNDL 21714

One of the most important and influential works of the middle ages—and a lot funnier than the Divine Comedy. Written in the midst of the social disruption caused by the Black Death (1348), the Decameron may have held readers attention for centuries because of its bawdiness, but it is also a profound exploration into the basis of faith and the meaning of death, the status of language, the construction of social hierarchy and social order, and the nature of crisis and historical change. Framed by a storytelling contest between seven young ladies and three young men who have left the city to avoid the plague, the one hundred stories of Boccaccio’s Decameron form a structural masterpiece that anticipates the Renaissance epics, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and the modern short story. Students will be encouraged to further explore in individual projects the many topics raised by the text, including (and in addition to the themes mentioned above) magic, the visual arts, mercantile culture, travel and discovery, and new religious practices.

2019-2020 Winter

ITAL 24930/ITAL 34930 Italy and the Bomb

A new form of literature, “indispensable for those who know and do not close their eyes” (Elias Canetti), was supposed to have emerged from the contemplation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki harrowing ruins. This new literature was supposed to have been capable of attenuating and reconciling; and it should have been able to engender, with its rhetorical devices, an antidote against the human instinct of destruction. This is the kind of literature that Elsa Morante calls for in her conference For or Against the Atomic Bomb, where she chooses to tackle such a “gloomy topic,” and yet one that “nobody should dare ignore”—nobody, and especially not a writer. During our course we will read those essays and novels written throughout the Sixties and Seventies that faced the issues posed by the atomic bomb. We will privilege Italian works, but we will also be attuned to the echoes of these themes within a global literary context. Topics to be investigated include the writer’s ethical response, the scientist’s responsibility and dilemmas, the omnipresence of apocalyptic fear, and the specter of humanity’s death drive. Texts by a range of authors, including De Martino, Morante, Moravia, Morselli, Sciascia, Volponi, Anders, Canetti, Oe, and Sebald, will be discussed. 

Prerequisites

Open to advanced undergrads with consent of instructor. Taught in Italian.

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 26000/ITAL 36000 Gramsci

Crosslistings
FNDL 26206,CMLT 26002,CMLT 36002

In this course we read selections from Antonio Gramsci's Letters and Prison Notebooks side by side with their sources. Gramsci's influential interpretations of the Italian Renaissance, Risorgimento, and Fascism are reviewed testi alla mano with the aim of reassessing some major turning points in Italian intellectual history. Readings and notions introduced include, for the Renaissance, Petrarch (the cosmopolitan intellectual), Savonarola (the disarmed prophet), Machiavelli (the modern prince), and Guicciardini (the particulare; for Italy's long Risorgimento, Vico (living philology), Cuoco (passive revolution), Manzoni (questione della lingua), Gioberti (clericalism), and De Sanctis (the Man of Guicciardini); and Croce (the anti-Croce) and Pirandello (theater and national-popular literature), for Italy's twentieth century.

2019-2020 Autumn

ITAL 26401/ITAL 36401 Torquato Tasso

Crosslistings
FNDL 26401

This course investigates the entire corpus of Torquato Tasso, the major Italian poet of the second half of the sixteenth century. We read in detail the Gerusalemme Liberata and Aminta, his two most famous works, in the context of their specific literary genre. We then spend some time examining the intricacies of his vast collection of lyric poetry, including passages from his poem "Il mondo creato." We also consider some of his dialogues in prose that address essential issues of Renaissance culture, such as the theories of love, emblematic expression, and the meaning of friendship.

Prerequisites

Taught in Italian.

2019-2020 Spring

ITAL 28702/ITAL 38702 Italian Comic Theater

Crosslistings
TAPS 28702, TAPS 38702

A survey of the history of Italian theater from the Erudite Renaissance Comedy to Goldoni’s reform. We will pay particular attention to the tradition of commedia dell’arte (scenarios, stock characters, and plot formation), ancient and medieval influences, evolution and emancipation of female characters, and the question of language. Readings include works by Plautus, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Angelo Beolco (Ruzante), Flaminio Scala, and Goldoni. Toward the end of the course we will consider the legacy of Italian Comedy in relation to the birth of grotesque and realist drama in Pirandello.

2019-2020 Winter

PORT 33660 Literary Cultures of Contemporary Latin America

Crosslistings
SPAN 33660

This course is designed for graduate students who wish to develop research projects exploring the many facets of Latin American literary cultures in the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. What is the role of memory in post-dictatorship literature and film in the Southern Cone? How to read contemporary poetry from a posthuman perspective? How can genres such as science fiction and horror contribute to our understanding of contemporary themes and problems? Students will meet regularly with the instructor to discuss their research topics and their progress. 

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Winter

PORT 25000/PORT 35000 The Amazon: Culture, History, Environment

Crosslistings
LACS 25005, LACS 35005, ENST 25000, SIGN 26059

From colonial travelers to contemporary popular culture, the Amazonian forest has been a source of endless fascination, greed and, more recently, ecological concern. The numerous actors that have been shaping the region, including artists, writers, scientists, anthropologists, indigenous peoples, and the extractive industry, among others, bring a multifaceted view of this region that has been described as the paradise on earth as much as a green hell. This course offers an overview of Amazonian history, cultures, and environmental issues that spans from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century. What are the major topics, works, and polemics surrounding the ways the Amazon has been depicted and imagined? How can the region’s history help us understand the state of environmental policies and indigenous rights today? What can we learn about the Amazon from literature and film? What is the future of the Amazon in the context of Brazil’s current political climate? From an interdisciplinary perspective, we will cover topics such as indigenous cultures and epistemologies, deforestation, travel writing, modern and contemporary literature, music, photography, and film, among others. Authors may include Claudia Andujar, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Euclides da Cunha, Ciro Guerra, Milton Hatoum, Susanna Hecht, Davi Kopenawa, Andrea Tonacci and the project Video in the Villages, among others. 

2019-2020 Spring

PORT 26304/PORT 36304 Literature and Society in Brazil

Crosslistings
HIST 26304,HIST 36304,LACS 26304,LACS 36304

This course explores the relations between literature and society in Brazil, with an emphasis on the institution of the novel in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The nineteenth-century Brazilian novel, like the Russian novel, was an arena in which intellectuals debated, publicized and perhaps even discovered social questions. We will examine ways in which fiction may be used and misused as a historical document of slavery and the rise of capitalism, of race relations, of patronage and autonomy, and of marriage, sex and love. We will read works in translation by Manuel Antonio de Almeida, José de Alencar, Machado de Assis, Aluísio de Azevedo and Euclides da Cunha.

Prerequisites

Taught in English. Students taking the course for RLL credit should do readings in Portuguese, attend the (additional) Portuguese-language discussion section, and attempt some writing in Portuguese.

2019-2020 Autumn

RLLT 33020 Journeys Real and Virtual. Travel in the Pre-modern Mediterranean

Crosslistings
CDIN 45085, ARTH 40585, RLVC 45805, HCHR 45805, NEHC 30585, HIST 60705

This course focuses on the art of travel in the Medieval and early modern Mediterranean. From the late Middle Ages through the sixteenth century, European pilgrimage to the Holy Land constituted some of the most advanced experiments in representing travel, describing foreign cities, and mapping out territories. Travel accounts represent the core material around which this course is structured along with images and maps in other contexts that such experiments influenced. Course material will span the fields of religion, art, literary, and urban history, encompassing historical geography, cartography, and cultural history. Students will engage directly with the verbal and visual modes that characterize the documentary legacy of mental and physical travel in order to come to terms with the different regimes of knowledge they construct as well as the cognitive demands they place on their audience. Through a comparison of techniques, students will explore the ways in which texts, images, and maps sought to understand human interaction, visualize geographical context, locate history, and make sense of the world beyond their drama of their local experience.

Prerequisites

Consent required. Please email Prof. Atkinson or Prof. Krause for request form. 

2019-2020 Spring

RLLT 37000 Revising Prose

This course is open to all graduate students and will be run as a workshop. The idea is to work intensely on one piece of scholarship throughout the quarter. Our primary goal will be publication of an article but this is also appropriate for anyone who wants to work on dissertation proposal or first chapter. We will cover all aspects of professional writing, from abstracts and grant proposals to revising manuscripts after readers' reports.

2019-2020 Autumn

RLLT 38800 Foreign Language Acquisition, Research and Teaching

This course provides students with a foundation in foreign language acquisition and sociolinguistic research pertinent to foreign language teaching and introduces current teaching methodologies and technologies and their usefulness in the classroom. 

Prerequisites

Open only to RLL students.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 23333/SPAN 33333 Reading Spanish for Research Purposes

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of Spanish to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research.

Prerequisites

One quarter of Spanish or equivalent, placement into SPAN 10200, or an intermediate level of another Romance or Classical language.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 33444 Fin-de-siglo, Modernización, Cultura, Exilio: El caso José Martí

Crosslistings
LACS 33444

Enfocándonos en la obra del escritor cubano José Martí, en este seminario abordaremos algunas cuestiones clave de los procesos de modernización cultural que se aceleraron en los mundos hispanoamericanos hacia finales del siglo XIX. Si bien este periodo vio el colapso final del imperio español en América (con la pérdida de sus últimas colonias, Cuba y Puerto Rico, en la Guerra del 1898), la emergencia de los Estados Unidos como una nueva potencia imperial, el fin de la esclavitud jurídica y el despegue de un proletariado industrial, urbano y militante (piedra de toque de una nueva concepción de “guerra social”), todo ello se dio en conjunto con otra serie de transformaciones culturales no menos significativas. Este fin de siglo fue escenario de importantes reformulaciones en la esfera de lo estético, en los modos de organización e institucionalización de la cultura y, más sutilmente, de agonías y euforias existenciales generadas por experiencias de exilio, entendidas aquí tanto en un sentido material como filosófico. Tal vez ningún otro escritor de las Américas registró con tal riqueza las complejidades inconmensurables de esa coyuntura en la historia de las Américas como José Martí. Con una obra ingente, y una experiencia de vida atenta que atravesara tres continentes, la escritura de Martí es verdadero síntoma y archivo de toda una época. En el seminario examinaremos el arco de la obra martiana desde sus escritos de juventud, sus crónicas periodísticas, su revolucionaria obra poética, culminando con su diario de campaña, escrito en el fragor de la última guerra de independencia cubana (1895) y testimonio emblemático de una vida encabalgada entre el arte y la política, entre el deseo y el imperativo moral. Estas lecturas se harán en contrapunto con la obra de otros escritores con quien Martí estableció un importante diálogo imaginario, entre ellos los norteamericanos Ralph Waldo Emerson y Walt Whitman y el irlandés Oscar Wilde. 

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 23555/SPAN 33555 Learned Women: Spaces of Knowledge, Self-Actualization, and Power

The hegemonic narrative of knowledge production in the Iberian Peninsula has historically centered on male writers, thus excluding contributions of women. This seminar will explore the intellectual interventions of medieval and early modern Iberian poets, professors, encyclopedists, and theologians who also happened to be women. Did these women present a perspective on knowledge-making different than their male counterparts? More importantly, what were the paths to knowledge that were available to them in a society that offered women limited social and intellectual roles? In this class we will be reading sources by Florencia Pinar, Teresa de Cartagena, Leonor López de Córdoba, Oliva Sabuco, among others; and critical pieces by Judith Butler, Andrea Dworkin, Silvia Federici, Luce Irigaray, and Sophie Lewis. 

Prerequisites

Taught in Spanish.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 33660 Literary Cultures of Contemporary Latin America

Crosslistings
PORT 33660

This course is designed for graduate students who wish to develop research projects exploring the many facets of Latin American literary cultures in the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. What is the role of memory in post-dictatorship literature and film in the Southern Cone? How to read contemporary poetry from a posthuman perspective? How can genres such as science fiction and horror contribute to our understanding of contemporary themes and problems? Students will meet regularly with the instructor to discuss their research topics and their progress. 

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 23801/SPAN 33801 Lope de Vega y el Arte nuevo de pintar tragedias

Lope de Vega’s Arte nuevo de hacer comedias signals a break from the past, a break from the distinctions between tragedy and comedy, a distancing from Cervantes’ La Numancia. While Lope revels in writing for all the people, Cervantes satirizes Lope’s desire to make writing a commercial enterprise. But Lope always glances back at the past and his works cannot be understood if we view them simply as a new genre. Emulating the classics, he takes up the ancient sisterhood between the arts and incorporates painting onstage, much like Cervantes had done before. In doing so, Lope’s texts become contaminated with the classical visions of the Italian Renaissance. Some of his plays even reflect Titian’s vision of pagan eros as part of the tragic. This course, then, will begin to study the rivalry between Cervantes and Lope de Vega, the competition between the arts, and Lope’s reluctant acceptance of tragedy as a compelling genre. We will conclude with works by Lope’s contemporaries who also used ekphrasis onstage: Claramonte, Tirso de Molina and Ruiz de Alarcón. 

Prerequisites

Taught in Spanish.

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 33950 Latin American Women Perform

Crosslistings
TAPS 33950, GNSE 33950, LACS 33950

This course examines the ways women from Latin America and the Caribbean wield performance art to engage their social realities and to engage questions of race, gender, and sexuality. How do women both produce and disidentify with constructs of womanhood on stage? How do they use performance to explore the ways histories of genocide, dictatorship, and imperialism shape constructs of gender? We examine the works of performance artists Congelada de Uva, Fomma, Regina Galindo, Nao Bustamante among others.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 34110 Ecocritical Perspectives in Latin American Literature and Film

Crosslistings
LACS 34110, PORT 34110

This course provides a survey of of ecocritical studies in Latin America. Through novels, poems, and films, we will examine a range of trends and problems posed by Latin American artists concerning environmental issues, from mid-nineteenth century to contemporary literature and film. Readings also include works of ecocritical criticism and theory that have been shaping the field in the past decades.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 24170/SPAN 34170 El arte de sobrevivir: la tradición picaresca

Crosslistings
LACS 24170, LACS 34170

La picaresca es un género de ficción en prosa con una tradición multisecular en las literaturas en español y con gran influencia en la historia de la novela moderna. La pobreza y la marginalidad convierte a los pícaros y las pícaras que protagonizan estas historias en astutos maestros en el arte de sobrevivir, en héroes plebeyos que luchan contra las determinaciones de la fortuna en una sociedad dinámica, pero sólidamente jerarquizada. Leeremos, por una parte, el Lazarillo de Tormes, algunas Novelas ejemplares de Cervantes, fragmentos de La pícara Justina y del Guzmán. Por otra, exploraremos los usos del género en algunas novelas modernas escritas en España y Latinoamérica, terminando con ejemplos de ficción televisiva contemporánea. Las estéticas del realismo y la novela moderna, la literatura y la economía, el humor y el lenguaje, el género y la sexualidad, la voz autobiográfica, las subjetividades de la marginalidad, o la relación entre el género picaresco y la historia nacional son algunos de los temas que guiarán nuestras lecturas y discusiones.

2019-2020 Winter

SPAN 34400 Cultura y Esclavitud en América Latina

La esclavitud en las Américas no fue únicamente un sistema de organización socio-económica fundamentado en el trabajo coactivo. Ella también conllevó la gestación de complejas y heterogéneas formas de producción cultural. En el contexto del moderno sistema de la plantación esclavista, esto implicó, en parte, una articulación intelectual y filosófica inédita de las relaciones entre poder, raza y cuerpo así como la producción de sofisticadas formas sincréticas de musicalidad y religiosidad populares y de numerosas representaciones artísticas y literarias en las que se simbolizaron las conflictivas y no pocas veces insólitas relaciones entre amos y esclavos.  Enfocándonos especialmente en el caso cubano, en este seminario estudiaremos una serie de textos y artefactos visuales que nos permitirán abordar algunas de las problemáticas clave en la formación de las culturas de la esclavitud en la América Latina: los basamentos intelectuales del régimen (tanto en términos filosóficos como jurídicos) y las críticas de que fue objeto, la dialéctica de subjetividades entre amos/as y esclavos/as y las dinámicas perversas de deseo, género y raza que la constituyeron.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 25660/SPAN 35660 US Imperialism and Cultural Practice in Latin America

Crosslistings
LACS 25660, LACS 35660

This course examines the ways histories of US intervention in Latin America have been engaged in cultural practice. We assess the history of US intervention by reading primary documents alongside cultural artifacts including film, performance and visual art, song, music, and poetry.  The course begins with the Cuban revolution and ends with the ongoing crisis in Puerto Rico.

Prerequisites

Taught in English

2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 27020/SPAN 37020 Christianity and Islam in the Western Mediterranean World during the Late Middle Ages (CANCELED)

Crosslistings
CATA 27020, CATA 37020, RLST 27020

El curso analizará los contactos mantenidos entre mundo cristiano y mundo islámico en el Mediterráneo bajomedieval, tomando la Corona de Aragón y sus ricas fuentes documentales como observatorio privilegiado. Las particularidades de la Corona de Aragón se compararán con las de otros estados cristianos del Occidente mediterráneo que mantuvieron relaciones sostenidas con los musulmanes. Tras la definición de la naturaleza y de las especificidades de los contactos político-diplomáticos, mercantiles y pirático-corsarios entre Cristiandad e Islam, las clases se focalizarán en la identificación y caracterización de colectivos y personas que actuaron como mediadores lingüísticos y culturales entre ambas realidades. Se determinarán las circunstancias y motivos que permitieron que agentes diplomáticos, mercaderes, mercenarios, piratas–corsarios o cautivos–esclavos vehicularan los contactos. Y se analizarán y compararán las distintas tipologías documentales que son plasmación de todos esos intercambios y contactos culturales y humanos.

Prerequisites

Taught in Spanish.

Roser Salicrú i Lluch
2019-2020 Spring

SPAN 38800 Problemas críticos y teóricos en el estudio de las culturas Ibéricas y Latinoamericanas

Crosslistings
LACS 38802

En este seminario abordaremos algunas de las problemáticas clave que han estructurado el campo de los estudios literarios hispánicos/ibéricos y latinoamericanos en las pasadas décadas.

2019-2020 Autumn

SPAN 29220/SPAN 39220 Espacio y memoria en el cine español

Crosslistings
BASQ 29220, BASQ 39330, CATA 29220, CATA 39220

Through the study of a selection of films and documentaries, this course will provide a critical examination of the history and poetics of cinema in Spain, with particular attention to the relation between the representation of space and the recovery of traumatic memory in contemporary culture.

2019-2020 Winter